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Premium Eng KS Videos V2

  • AC Arthritis

    Osteoarthritis of the AC joint in the shoulder is common in middle-aged or older adults. This video explains how this condition develops and how you can minimize its effects.

  • ACL Injuries

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee can be injured during sporting activities, particularly when an athlete pivots suddenly. The ACL is one of four knee ligaments that stabilize the knee. This video discusses how the knee works and what you should do if you sustain an ACL injury.

  • All About Arthritis

    Arthritis refers to a group of disorders that involve the body’s joints and have similar symptoms, including pain, stiffness, and swelling. Learn about the different types of arthritis and their treatment.

  • Ankle Arthritis and Replacement

    The most common form of arthritis affecting the ankle is osteoarthritis. It can be caused by injury or by long-term wear and tear. Take a look at this condition and how it is treated, including surgery to replace the ankle joint.

  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a condition that causes numbness and aching in the hands and arms. It becomes worse with participation in some common sports or jobs. Learn how CTS develops and what you can do to prevent it.

  • Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

    This condition occurs when pressure is put on the ulnar nerve at the elbow. This video explains the condition, including its symptoms and possible treatment.

  • De Quervain's Disease

    De Quervain's disease causes inflammation in the tissues surrounding the tendons of the muscles of the hand that cause thumb extension. This video examines what causes this condition and what treatment is recommended.

  • Dupuytren's Disease

    In 1831, a French surgeon named Baron Dupuytren described a condition that produced nodules on the palm or palm side of the fingers. In this video, you will find out the possible causes of Dupuytren's disease and what can be done to relieve symptoms.

  • Elbow Arthritis and Replacement

    When the cartilage in the elbow wears or is damaged, osteoarthritis can develop. This damage may be due to injury or advancing age. Learn more about osteoarthritis of the elbow and when replacement surgery may be advised.

  • Ganglion Cyst

    Ganglion is a Greek word that means "a knot of tissue." Basically, a ganglion cyst is a bump or mass that forms under the skin. These cysts can occur at any joint or tendon sheath, but most often they appear on the back of the wrist or on the fingers. This video explains what can be done for a ganglion cyst.

  • Wrist Fracture

    Your wrist is a complex joint made up of many bones, allowing you to move your hand up and down, and side to side, as well as to rotate. A fracture can occur in any of these bones when enough force is applied—when you fall on an outstretched hand, for example. In this video, you'll find out other causes, as well as how a wrist fracture is treated.

  • Tennis Elbow

    Tennis elbow is the term for a painful condition that causes pain and tenderness in the bony bump on the outer part of the elbow. This video discusses the possible causes and what you can do to prevent it.

  • Hip Fracture

    A hip fracture occurs when the hip bone cracks or breaks. Hear about how a hip fracture is treated and what steps you can take to prevent it.

  • Hip Revision

    Artificial hip joints have become quite common in recent years. Over time, however, some hip implants may loosen or otherwise need to be repaired. This video takes a look at hip revision surgery.

  • Meniscal Injuries

    Knee injuries are common problems—and not just in athletes. Oftentimes, the cartilage, called the meniscus, is to blame. The meniscus can be damaged when you twist your upper leg while keeping your foot in one place. Watch this video to learn how meniscal injuries are treated and how you can prevent them.

  • Trigger Finger

    Trigger finger is a common disorder of the hand that is characterized by a painful catching of the fingers or thumb. It is caused by an inflammation and narrowing of the sheath that surrounds the tendons that bend the fingers. In this video, you'll learn the possible causes and recommended treatment.

  • Rotator Cuff Injuries

    The tendons of four muscles in the upper arm form the rotator cuff, blending together to help stabilize the shoulder. The rotator cuff tendons allow you to raise and rotate your arm. This video discusses what happens when these tendons are damaged.

  • Knee Arthritis and Fixed Knee Replacement

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis that affects the knee. In this condition, the slippery cartilage that covers the ends of bones in knee joint wears down. This video also explores a treatment option called a fixed knee replacement.

  • Medial / Lateral Collateral Injuries

    Ligaments are strong bands of tissue that add strength and give stability to a joint. The medial and lateral collateral ligaments of the knee can be damaged when the knee is hit on the outer side, as can occur in football or hockey. This video looks at how these injuries are treated and what can be done to prevent them.

  • Olecranon Bursitis

    Bursitis of the tip of the elbow occurs when the fluid-filled sac in the elbow becomes irritated or inflamed. In this video, you'll find out the possible causes of this condition and the recommended treatment.

  • Trochanteric Bursitis

    Trochanteric bursitis is a condition affecting the side of the hip. This condition usually affects middle-aged or elderly adults, and women more often than men. This video looks at the causes of this bursitis and what steps you can take to prevent it.

  • Shoulder Arthritis and Replacement

    Although used less commonly than knee or hip replacement, shoulder replacement surgery removes diseased or damaged bone in the shoulder and replaces it with an artificial joint. If arthritis pain is unrelieved by other methods, you may need replacement surgery. Learn how the shoulder works and what to expect in replacement surgery.

  • Hip Arthritis and Replacement

    When the hip joint is injured or develops arthritis, hip replacement surgery may be recommended. This video takes a closer look at hip arthritis and what to expect during hip replacement surgery.

  • Knee Arthritis and Mobile Knee Replacement

    Arthritis comes in many forms, several of which can affect the knee. When the cartilage in the knee wears out or is damaged by arthritis, your doctor may recommend an artificial knee joint. This video explains knee replacement surgery.

  • Pre-Patellar Bursitis

    Bursitis of the knee—also called "housemaid's knee"—is caused when the bursa that surrounds the kneecap swells. In this video, you will find out the causes of this condition, as well as what you can do to prevent it.

  • Total Knee Replacement

    Degenerative changes or injury to the knee can cause pain, swelling, and immobility. When knee pain affects your quality of life, you may be a candidate for total knee replacement. In this video, you will learn about knee replacement surgery, its benefits, and its potential risks.

  • PIP / DIP Arthritis

    Arthritis can occur in the hands, affecting the finger knuckles (the PIP joints) and the end joints of the fingers (the DIP joints). This video discusses the possible causes, symptoms, and recommended treatment of this type of arthritis.

  • Shoulder Instability / Dislocation

    Maybe you were tackled in a weekend football game and felt your shoulder give way in a burst of pain. Or perhaps you have noticed over time that, in certain positions, your shoulder just doesn’t feel "solid." Watch this video to find out what happens when your shoulder is unstable or becomes dislocated.

  • Impingement Syndrome

    If the bones and tissue in your upper arm are improperly aligned, you have impingement syndrome. This condition is often a precondition for many common shoulder ailments, including bursitis, tendonitis, and arthritis. This video explains the possible causes and recommended treatment.

  • Wrist Arthritis and Replacement

    The two most common types of arthritis that affect the wrist are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. When other forms of treatment don't relieve the pain of your wrist arthritis, your doctor may recommend an artificial joint. This video discusses what to expect during wrist replacement surgery.

  • Patellar Instability and Arthritis

    You may feel your kneecap slide out of place sometimes when you bend down. It might slip entirely out of place, or maybe it just seems to give out more than you think it used to. This video explains what can happen to the kneecap and how arthritis can affect it.

  • MCP Arthritis and Replacement

    The large joints on your hand at the base of the fingers are called MCP (metacarpophalangeal) joints. Over time, arthritis can damage these joints, causing pain. If other treatment options don't relieve the pain, your doctor may suggest artificial joints. This video discusses what to expect during MCP replacement surgery.

  • CMC Arthritis

    Arthritis in the small joint at the base of the thumb—the CMC joint—is a condition that can affect both strength and function of the hand. The condition is most common in women older than 40 and often affects both hands. In this video, you'll find out how this arthritis develops and the recommended treatment.

  • Cervical Arthritis

    Your neck is the upper or cervical part of your spine, a column of 33 bones called vertebrae. Cervical arthritis is a condition that occurs when the cartilage and vertebrae in the neck wear abnormally. This video explains how the condition develops and what treatments are available.

  • Cervical Disk Rupture

    The vertebrae in your spine are cushioned by soft disks. When one of the disks in your neck—the cervical area of your spine—ruptures, the result can be neck pain. Watch this video to find out the possible causes and recommended treatment.

  • Low Back Sprain

    A low back or lumbar sprain is one of the most common causes of pain in the lower back. It occurs when the back muscles in that area are stretched abnormally or torn. This video discusses the possible causes and what you can do to prevent it.

  • Lumbar Disk Rupture

    The vertebrae in your spine are cushioned by soft disks. When one of the disks in your lower back or lumbar area ruptures, the result can be pain, numbness, or weakness in the lower back, buttocks, and legs. In this video, you'll learn the possible causes and recommended treatment.

  • Scoliosis (Long)

    Scoliosis is a condition that causes the spine to curve sideways. It can develop during childhood or adolescence and can range from mild to severe. This video explains how scoliosis occurs and what treatments are available.

  • Burst Fracture

    A burst fracture is a traumatic fracture of the bones of the spine often caused by a fall when a person lands on his or her feet. The fractured bones spread out and may damage the spinal cord. The video discusses the seriousness of this injury, which can lead to paralysis and other health problems.

  • Lumbar/Lumbosacral Arthritis

    This type of arthritis affects the lower back and pelvic area, causing pain, inflammation, and loss of motion. This video explains how this arthritis develops, who's at risk, and what treatments are available.

  • Spondylolisthesis

    This condition occurs when one of the vertebrae in the lower back slips out of place, onto the vertebra below it. Arthritis or another degenerative disease is the most common cause. This video examines the symptoms, causes, and possible treatments.

  • Spinal Stenosis

    Spinal stenosis is a condition in which the spinal canal narrows and pinches the nerves, resulting in back and leg pain. Spinal stenosis often occurs in older adults, although younger people who are born with a small spinal canal may also develop symptoms. This video explains the condition and what treatments are recommended.

  • Paralysis: Paralysis Resource Center

    The Christopher and Dana Reeve Paralysis Resource Center promotes the health and well-being of both people living with paralysis and their families. This video offers a profile of the center and its mission to provide comprehensive information resources and referral services.

  • Paralysis: Hands-Free Computing

    The computer is one of the most liberating tools for people with disabilities. It can take information from not only a keyboard, but also a mouth stick, voice, Morris code, or other device. This video explores the options available for hands-free computing.

  • Paralysis: Independent Living Centers

    For people newly disabled, independent living centers can be a primary resource. ILCs offer a range of assistance, including advocacy, information and referral, housing, and peer counseling. This video gives a comprehensive look at ILCs and how they can help you.

  • Paralysis: For Caregivers

    Living with a disability is a family affair, and caregivers can feel overwhelmed by their responsibilities. Caregiving can be a very fulfilling job but also very draining. This video looks at the role of the caregiver and how a caregiver can cope with the emotional and physical demands of the situation.

  • Bacterial Pneumonia

    Pneumonia is a term that refers to inflammation of the lung. Bacterial pneumonia means that the inflammation is caused by a bacterial infection. This video takes a look at the possible causes and recommended treatments.

  • Kidney Stones

    Kidney stones are a common problem, affecting about 12 percent of men and 5 percent of women. Stones are typically caused by an imbalance in the urinary system: too little water, too much oxalate, or too much calcium. In this video, you'll find out how the stones develop and what you can do to prevent them.

  • Ankle Sprain

    An ankle sprain is one of the most common sports injuries. It occurs when your foot turns in on itself, stretching and weakening the ligaments that bridge the ankle and foot bones. This video explains the possible causes, recommended treatment, and what you can do to prevent a sprain.

  • Concussion

    A concussion is an injury to the brain caused by a blow to the head, or by striking the head on another object. It may result in loss of consciousness or confusion, but the effects usually resolve in a few hours or days. This video explains what happens during a concussion, how it should be treated, and what preventive steps to take.

  • Otitis Media

    Otitis media is an infection involving the middle ear, the area between the eardrum and the eustachian tube. Although the infection can occur at any age, it is most common in infants and children. This video discusses possible causes and recommended treatment.

  • Urinary Tract Infection, Male

    A urinary tract infection is a bacterial infection that can affect the bladder, the kidneys, or both. The most common cause is the bacterium Escherichia coli, which is found in the gastrointestinal tract. In this video, you'll learn about the symptoms and treatment, as well as how to prevent an infection.

  • Seizure Disorder, Petit Mal

    A seizure is caused by abnormal signals in the brain. One type of generalized seizure is the petit mal or absence seizure. A person having this type of seizure has only brief breaks of consciousness that may not be noticed. This video explains how a petit mal seizure occurs and what treatments are available.

  • Cluster Headache

    Cluster headaches are uncommon, but when they occur, they bring on severe head pain. The pain is constant, focused in and around one eye. This video discusses the possible causes of this type of headache and recommended treatments.

  • Tension Type Headache

    Tension headaches are usually dull, aching, or throbbing headaches often associated with sensations of fullness, tightness, or pressure. The pain involves both sides of the head and neck. In this video, you'll find out more about symptoms, possible causes, and recommended treatments.

  • Seizure Disorder, Grand Mal

    A seizure is caused by abnormal signals in the brain. One type of generalized seizure is the grand mal seizure. A person have this type of seizure may lose consciousness, as well as bowel and bladder control. This video explains what occurs during a grand mal seizure and what treatments are available.

  • Migraine Headache

    Migraine headaches are intense, recurrent headaches that may occur at any age but usually begin between the ages of 10 and 30 years. The precise cause is unknown, but it is hereditary in up to 80 percent of cases. This video gives additional details about migraines, including their symptoms and effective treatments.

  • Hepatitis A

    Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. The hepatitis A virus is one of five that cause this disease. This video takes a closer look at hepatitis A—how it is spread and what you can do to prevent its transmission.

  • Multiple Sclerosis

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a slowly progressive disease of the central nervous system. MS damages the protective covering of nerve fibers, which leads to multiple physical problems. In this video, you'll learn about possible causes, the range of symptoms, and treatments available.

  • Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    Pelvic inflammatory disease is a bacterial infection of the pelvic organs. It may affect only the fallopian tubes, or it may include all the pelvic organs, the uterus, ovaries, and fallopian tubes. This video explains how this common disease occurs and what steps you can take to prevent it.

  • Seizures, Febrile

    Febrile seizures, or seizures that occur during a fever, are one of the most common neurologic disorders of childhood. They typically appear between 6 months and 3 years of age. This video looks at the possible causes, typical symptoms, and what you should do as a parent.

  • Myasthenia Gravis

    Myasthenia gravis is a disease of the central nervous system characterized by sporadic muscular fatigue and weakness. It occurs chiefly in the muscles of swallowing and chewing, as well as the muscles of the eyes, face, and neck. This video explores possible causes of this disease, as well as available treatments.

  • Corneal Abrasion

    The cornea functions as a "clear window" on the front of the eye. A corneal abrasion is a scratch on the surface of the cornea. This video discusses how a corneal abrasion occurs, available treatments, and preventive steps you can take.

  • Low Back Pain

    Acute low back pain usually results from an injury or an accident and lasts less than a week. Chronic low back pain may last for more than three months. This video looks at how to manage back pain.

  • Costochondritis

    The ribs are connected to the breastbone by cartilage. This connection is called the "costochondral junction." Costochondritis is chest pain and tenderness in this region of the chest. In this video, you'll find out the different types of this condition and the treatments available.

  • Transient Ischemic Attack

    A transient ischemic attack (TIA), also called a ministroke stroke, causes symptoms similar to those of a stroke. The difference is that TIAs don’t cause permanent brain damage. This video explains what happens during a TIA, what you should do if you have symptoms, and what treatment is available.

  • Gastritis

    Gastritis is an inflammation of the lining of the stomach. It can have a number of causes, but most are lifestyle excesses—smoking, too much alcohol, too much caffeine, and overeating. This video explores the many causes of gastritis, recommended treatments, and preventive steps.

  • Otitis Externa

    Otitis externa is an infection or inflammation of the outer ear canal, from the eardrum to the outer opening. Two common causes are swimming in contaminated water and inflammation caused by an allergy to hair spray. This video takes a look at other possible causes, recommended treatment, and what you can do to prevent infection.

  • Allergic Rhinitis

    Allergic rhinitis is also known as "hay fever." The symptoms can be seasonal, especially in the spring and fall, or year round. In this video, you'll learn what happens when you have allergic rhinitis and what you can do to minimize symptoms.

  • Urinary Incontinence

    Urinary incontinence is the uncontrollable loss of urine. The two most common types of incontinence are "stress incontinence" and "urge incontinence." This video looks at these common types and offers information on available treatments.

  • Peptic Ulcer Disease

    Peptic ulcers are erosions in the lining of the esophagus, stomach, or duodenum. Ulcers in the stomach are called gastric ulcers, and duodenal ulcers if in the duodenum. This video explains the possible causes of this disease, including the bacterium Helicobacter pylori.

  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a disease affecting the intestines. The cause of IBS is not known, but stress and emotions are thought to play a role. This video gives more details about this common disorder, which affects up to 15 percent of Americans.

  • Anaphylaxis

    Anaphylaxis is a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction. Common causes of anaphylaxis are allergies to penicillin, bee stings, aspirin, eggs, peanuts, and nuts. In this video, you'll find out other possible causes, what preventive steps you can take to avoid anaphylaxis, and why emergency treatment is needed.

  • Acute Bronchitis

    Acute bronchitis refers to inflammation of the central airways that usually clears up within four to eight weeks. Viral infections are the most common cause. This video explores other possible causes, available treatments, and preventive steps you can take.

  • Contact Dermatitis

    Contact dermatitis is a common skin rash that may be dry, red, and blistered. It is caused by skin contact with material that either irritates the skin or causes skin allergies. This video examines the possible causes of contact dermatitis and the treatments available, including avoiding contact with the problem materials.

  • Premenstrual Syndrome

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a group of symptoms that occur in some women during the second half of their menstrual cycle. These symptoms include irritability, anxiety, and depression. This video explains what how PMS develops and what you can do to minimize its effects.

  • GERD

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is more commonly known as acid indigestion or heartburn. It is a burning feeling behind the breastbone. This video takes a look at the possible causes of GERD, typical symptoms, and when treatment is warranted.

  • Osteoarthritis

    Osteoarthritis most commonly affects the knees, hips, spine, and other weight-bearing joints in the body. Sometimes called the "wear and tear" arthritis, advancing age is a risk factor, but so are obesity and severe injury to the joint. This video discusses the symptoms, treatment, and steps you can take to minimize pain from osteoarthritis.

  • Diabetes, Type 1

    Recently updated to focus on patients diagnosed when an adult. Updated animations of blood glucose and insulin interaction provide a better understanding of Type 1 diabetes. Explains how Type 1 Diabetes cannot be prevented and helps patients learn how to manage the condition. Covers common risk factors, as well as treatment options and side effects. Also available in Spanish.

  • Diabetes, Type 2

    Updated with new animations, this program explains how insulin resistance can lead to pre-diabetes and then to Type 2 Diabetes. A straightforward explanation of risk factors along with signs and symptoms and complications encourages the viewer to start thinking about lifestyle changes.

  • Prostate Cancer

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the United States. One in five men will have a diagnosis of prostate cancer in his lifetime. In this video, you'll find out about diagnostic tests available, as well as recommended treatments.

  • Bursitis

    Bursitis is an inflammation of a closed sac of fluid located near the joints called a bursa. When the bursa becomes inflamed, it causes joint pain and swelling. Learn about the causes and treatment of bursitis, as well as what you can do to help prevent its recurrence.

  • Rosacea

    Rosacea is a skin disease that affects people 30 to 60 years old. The cause is unknown, but it is in part hereditary. Alcohol, hot beverages, and certain foods can worsen the disease. This video explains how rosacea is diagnosed and how medication can manage symptoms.

  • Diverticulitis

    Diverticuli are herniations in the muscular layer of the colon that produce small, saclike swellings. Diverticulitis occurs when diverticuli become inflamed and infected. This video examines the possible causes of this condition, typical symptoms, and available treatments.

  • Obesity

    People can become obese by taking in more calories than they burn. Obesity also appears to be influenced by genetics. This video discusses the health risks associated with obesity and what treatment and lifestyle changes are commonly recommended.

  • Sinusitis

    Sinusitis is an inflammation of the sinuses that can be acute or chronic. Common causes are bacteria, allergies, pollution, and nasal polyps. This video explores how sinusitis develops, typical symptoms, and what your doctor may prescribe as treatment.

  • Colon Cancer Screening

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and women in the US. A low-fiber, high-fat diet appears to increase the risk for this type of cancer. In this video, you'll learn how colon cancer can be detected early and therefore, treated more successfully.

  • Hypothyroidism

    Hypothyroidism occurs when the thyroid doesn't produce enough thyroid hormone. The condition may be caused by birth defects, viruses, or autoimmune diseases. This video discusses other possible causes and recommended treatment, which is usually synthetic thyroid tablets.

  • Ringworm

    Ringworm is a general term used to describe a very common type of skin infection. It is not caused by a worm at all, but by a fungus. In this video, you'll learn more about the fungus that causes ringworm and what steps you can take to prevent the infection.

  • Pressure Ulcers

    A pressure ulcer is a sore that results from the death of the skin and its underlying tissue in areas of the body that receive pressure. This occurs when a patient sits or lies still for long periods. This video describes how pressure ulcers develop, what treatment is available, and how they can be prevented.

  • Hemochromatosis

    Hemochromatosis is a condition in which a person's body is overloaded with iron. The excess iron accumulates in various organs and can cause health problems. This video discusses the possible causes of hemochromatosis, typical symptoms, and what treatments are available.

  • Hepatitis B

    Hepatitis B is one of five virus types that cause hepatitis, an inflammation of the liver. Hepatitis B is considered a sexually transmitted disease. This video takes an in-depth look at hepatitis B—how common it is, how it is spread, and what you can do to prevent its transmission.

  • Hepatitis C

    The hepatitis C virus is another type of hepatitis virus that causes an inflammation of the liver. HCV is transmitted though exposure to infected blood or blood products. In this video, you'll find out more about how it's transmitted, what treatments are available, and what you can do to protect yourself from this disease.

  • Herpes Zoster

    Herpes zoster, also known as shingles, is an uncomfortable and often very painful outbreak of skin blisters and sores. The condition is caused by the varicella-zoster virus, the same virus that causes chickenpox. This video explains how shingles develop, what treatment is available, and preventive steps to take, including vaccination.

  • Frozen Shoulder

    Frozen shoulder is a painful condition that usually results in decreased range of motion of the shoulder joint. It may develop gradually or suddenly and severely. This video offers information on how frozen shoulder occurs, who's at risk, and what treatments are available.

  • Rotator Cuff Tendinitis/Tear

    Having shoulder pain or problems lifting your arms over your head? You may have tendonitis or a tear in the muscles and tendons that hold your shoulder in place, called the rotator cuff. This video explains symptoms of this syndrome, possible treatments, and ways you can prevent shoulder injuries.

  • Tinea Versicolor

    Tinea versicolor is a skin disorder caused by a type of yeast normally found on the skin. It is more common during hot, humid weather, when the yeast can overgrow. Watch this video to learn how this condition is diagnosed and treated.

  • Tinea Pedis

    Tinea pedis, commonly called athlete's foot, is a foot infection caused by a fungus. Tinea pedis is most frequently seen in adolescents and adults during the warm months, but can occur at any time. This video discusses how athlete's foot develops, typical symptoms, and recommended treatment.

  • Pityriasis Rosea

    Pityriasis rosea is a skin condition seen most frequently in children and young adults. It may be caused by a virus, but it is not considered to be contagious. The video explains the symptoms and recommended treatment.

  • Lactose Intolerance Pediatric

    A child who has difficulty digesting cow's milk has lactose intolerance. Lactose is the main sugar in cow's milk, and the inability to digest lactose is caused by a shortage of the enzyme lactase. This video tells you what to do as a parent if your child has this condition.

  • Lactose Intolerance Adult

    Lactose is the main sugar in cow's milk. People who have difficulty digesting milk have lactose intolerance. The condition is caused by a shortage of the enzyme lactase, which breaks down the lactose into a form that can be used by the body. This video explains how you can cope with this condition.

  • Tinea Unguium

    Tinea unguium is a fungal infection of the nails, particularly the toenails. Tinea of the toenail occurs most often in people who have frequent bouts of athlete's foot. This video discusses typical symptoms and the difficulty in eliminating the fungus once it takes hold.

  • Cataracts

    A cataract is a clouding of the natural lens within the eye that often occurs as a person ages. Although many cataracts develop without a known cause, long-term steroid use and diabetes are risk factors. Watch this video to find out what you can expect if you develop a cataract.

  • Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a form of arthritis that primarily affects the ligaments and joints of the spine, especially the lower back. As the disease progresses, it can lead to a stooped posture. In this video, you'll find out how this condition develops and the treatments available.

  • Atrial Fibrillation

    Fibrillation is a type of abnormal muscle contraction. A fibrillating heart muscle looks as if it is wiggling rather than squeezing and does not move blood the way a normal contraction does. This video discusses what happens when the fibrillation is in the atrium, one of the upper chambers of the heart.

  • Anemia

    Anemia, or a low level of hemoglobin in the blood, can be brought on by chronic disease. This includes inflammatory, infectious, or malignant conditions. This video provides information on the chronic diseases linked to anemia and recommended treatment.

  • Asbestosis

    Asbestos is a natural fibrous material known for its flame resistance and insulation properties. Breathing in these fibers, however, can damage the lungs. Workers who come in contact with asbestos are at highest risk for lung problems. This video explains why asbestos is such a health danger and what steps you can take to protect yourself.

  • Lumbar Disk Disease

    Your lumbar spine, or low back, is made of five vertebrae separated by cushioning disks of cartilage. Degenerative conditions or trauma can damage a disk, allowing the material inside to bulge into the spinal canal. This video discusses the effects of this bulging or herniated disk.

  • Metatarsalgia

    Metatarsalgia is a term used to describe pain in the ball of the foot. Wearing high heels, for instance, can place enough force on the ball of the foot that the metatarsal bones become inflamed, bringing on this condition. In this video, you'll find out other possible causes and how your doctor makes the diagnosis.

  • Scoliosis

    Scoliosis is a condition that causes the spine to curve sideways. It can develop during childhood or adolescence and can range from mild to severe. This video explains how scoliosis occurs and what treatments are available.

  • Impetigo

    Impetigo is a mild skin infection seen most frequently in children. It is caused by skin bacteria, usually staph (staphylococci) or strep (streptococci). This video takes a closer look at this contagious disease.

  • Plantar Warts

    All warts are caused by the human papillomavirus. In the case of plantar warts, the virus infects the bottom of the feet. Walking or even standing can become painful because of the pressure of the wart on the foot. This video discusses what to do if you develop a plantar wart.

  • Urethritis

    Urethritis is an inflammation of the urethra, the tube that carries urine from the bladder. The inflammation is caused by a bacterial infection, trauma, or as a reaction to bath oils and bubble baths. In this video, you'll find out what to do if you develop urethritis and how you can prevent its occurrence.

  • Lead Poisoning Screening

    Lead can have harmful effects on health because it blocks one of the crucial steps in blood formation. This can cause severe anemia, especially in children. This video explains what a lead screening test is and when it is warranted.

  • Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding

    Dysfunctional uterine bleeding is irregular bleeding during a menstrual cycle that is caused by hormonal problems. The most common hormonal irregularity occurs because the ovary did not produce an egg during that particular cycle. This video explores other causes and when this bleeding is of concern.

  • Premature Ventricular Contractions

    As the name suggests, premature ventricular contractions are contractions in the lower chambers of the heart that occur too early in the rhythm sequence. These contractions, also called Paces, are common, particularly in older adults. This video discusses what effect these contractions can have on your health.

  • Dysmenorrhea

    Dysmenorrhea is severe uterine cramping and pain during a menstrual period. Women with this condition have a chemical imbalance—in particular, a high level of prostaglandin, which controls uterine contractions. In this video, you'll learn how this condition develops and what you can do to minimize the effects.

  • Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Posttraumatic distress disorder (PTSD) can develop after a person experiences a traumatic event that involves actual or threatened death or serious injury. PTSD can occur whether you experienced this event or merely witnessed it. This video explores the symptoms and recommended treatment of this disorder.

  • Hip Pain

    Hip pain can be caused by an injury, a fracture, a tumor, or a disease such as osteoarthritis that affects the hip joint. This video explains other possible causes of hip pain and what you can do to cope.

  • Pyelonephritis

    Pyelonephritis is an infection of the kidney. It usually starts as a urinary tract infection that spreads from the urinary tract to the bladder to the kidney. This video takes a closer look at this serious illness, which can lead to kidney scarring.

  • Melanoma Screening

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the US. Melanoma is the least common, but the most deadly of the three skin cancer types. In this video, you'll learn who's at risk for melanoma, what to look for to help detect this cancer, and what you can do to prevent it.

  • Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a disorder that causes intense, stabbing, "electric shock-like" pain in the areas of the face where the nerve is distributed—the jaw, lips, eyes, nose, scalp, forehead, and face. In this video, you'll find out how this disorder develops and what treatments are available.

  • Varicose Veins

    A varicose vein is an abnormal dilation of the vessels that carry blood back to the heart. Although veins are located throughout the body, varicose veins are most commonly seen in the legs. This video looks at who's at risk for this condition, typical symptoms, and available treatments.

  • Chronic Pancreatitis

    Chronic pancreatitis is a persistent inflammation of the pancreas, the gland that secretes digestive enzymes and the hormones insulin and glucagon. Alcohol abuse is the most common cause of this condition. This video discusses how this condition develops and what treatment your doctor may recommend.

  • Bacterial Food Poisoning

    Bacterial food poisoning occurs after eating contaminated food. A variety of bacteria can cause foodborne illness, and most cases clear up in a few days. This video examines the culprits that cause this illness, typical symptoms, and preventive steps you can take.

  • Polymyalgia Rheumatica

    Polymyalgia rheumatica is a type of inflammation that produces pain and stiffness in the muscles around the neck, shoulders, buttocks, hips, and thighs. In this video, you'll learn how this condition develops and who's at risk.

  • Urinary Tract Infection, Female

    A urinary tract infection is a bacterial infection that can affect the bladder and spread to the kidneys. The most common cause is the bacterium Escherichia coli, which is found in the gastrointestinal tract. This video offers information on typical symptoms, available treatments, and preventive measures.

  • Lyme Disease

    Lyme disease is an illness spread by the bite of an infected tick. A bull's-eye rash is a typical symptom that identifies this illness, which untreated can affect many parts of the body. This video explains how the illness develops and what you can do to protect yourself against tick bites.

  • Endometriosis

    Endometriosis is a condition in which tissue similar to the lining of the uterus grows in the abdominal cavity. This tissue responds to hormonal changes in the same way that the uterine lining responds. This video takes a closer look at this condition and the recommended treatments.

  • Hand Foot And Mouth Disease

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease is a contagious viral infection that starts in the throat. It affects children up to age 3 and usually resolves in four to five days without treatment. This video examines how this illness spreads and describes the typical symptoms.

  • Alcoholic Hepatitis

    Alcoholic hepatitis is caused by excessive and chronic alcohol use and can progress to fatty liver and cirrhosis if the alcohol abuse continues. This video explores who is at risk for this disease and how your health care provider makes the diagnosis.

  • Diverticulosis

    Diverticulosis occurs when part of the colon bulges through a muscular layer into the abdomen, called diverticula. Learn about this condition, possible complications, and what you should do if you have diverticulosis.

  • Herpes Simplex

    Herpes simplex is a virus in the family of viruses that cause chickenpox, shingles, and mononucleosis. One type of the herpes virus causes cold sores around the mouth; another type causes genital herpes. This video looks at the types of herpes simplex and what you can do to prevent their spread.

  • Angioedema

    Angioedema is a skin condition very similar to hives. In hives, raised, red, itchy, irregular bumps appear on the skin; in angioedema, the same thing happens beneath the skin. Instead of being itchy, angioedema is tender or painful. This video offers additional details about this condition and how it develops.

  • Pseudomembranous Colitis

    Pseudomembranous colitis is an inflammatory disorder of the colon associated with antibiotic use. Bacteria such as Clostridium difficile, which are usually present in the colon, can flourish when antibiotics are taken. This video explains how this disorder develops and what treatment is recommended.

  • Mononucleosis

    Mononucleosis is an acute infectious disease that affects the respiratory system, the liver, and the lymphatic system. It is caused by the Epstein-Barr virus. This video looks at who is at risk for this infection and typical symptoms to watch for.

  • Labyrinthitis

    Labyrinthitis describes an upset in the balance mechanism of the inner ear. It may be caused by a viral or bacterial infection, but most episodes have no known cause. In this video, you'll learn the possible causes of this condition and what you can do about it.

  • Atopic Dermatitis

    Atopic dermatitis is a skin inflammation caused by sensitivity to something in the environment. It often runs in families and may occur along with hay fever, asthma, or nasal allergies. This video explores the possible triggers for the condition and who is at risk.

  • Scabies

    Scabies is an extremely itchy rash caused by a tiny mite that burrows into the skin. The mite spreads easily from person to person and is common in young children. This video offers more details about the rash and what steps you can take to protect yourself and your family.

  • Cholelithiasis

    Cholelithiasis is another name for gallstones. The gallbladder is a small organ attached to your liver that stores the bile your liver makes. Under the right conditions and over time, gallstones can form in the gallbladder. This video explains how gallstones develop and what treatments are available.

  • Testicular Cancer Screening

    Testicular cancer is cancer that begins in the testicles. Most testicular cancer patients are men 20 to 40 years old. This video offers details on who is at risk for this type of cancer and how this cancer is diagnosed.

  • Pseudogout

    Pseudogout is an abrupt and often very painful form of arthritis that affects people older than 60. It is called pseudogout, or false gout, because it resembles gout but has a different cause. This video takes a closer look at this condition and what can be done to prevent it.

  • Renal Artery Stenosis

    The main blood vessels that bring clean blood to your kidneys are called the renal arteries. With age, these arteries can become blocked and may cause high blood pressure. In this video, you'll find out how the blockage develops and what treatments are available to minimize symptoms.

  • Raynaud's Phenomenon

    Raynaud's phenomenon causes temporary decreased blood flow to the fingers, toes, and ears. It typically occurs in cold weather, when blood flow decreases in the fingers and toes. This video describes the common symptoms of this condition and the recommended treatment.

  • Claudication

    Claudication refers to leg pain brought on by exertion and relieved with rest. The primary cause of claudication is atherosclerosis, or narrowing of the arteries that feed the leg muscles. This video explains who is at risk for this condition and what you can do to help prevent it.

  • Back Health: Lifting

    To protect your back when lifting an object, keep your spine in proper alignment. One way to remember this is to keep your ears over your shoulders and your shoulders over your hips. This video discusses other ways you can avoid back injuries.

  • Cholesterol Screening

    Your body needs cholesterol to make hormones and to keep your cells healthy. Cholesterol comes from two sources: your liver and your diet. However, if your diet exceeds the body’s need for cholesterol or saturated fats, your cholesterol level in your blood will increase. This video discusses treatments and lifestyle changes that may be prescribed by your doctor.

  • Smoking Cessation, Stages of Change

    Cigarette smoking is the single leading cause of preventable death and disease in the United States. But because of the physical and psychological addiction to nicotine, smokers find it quite difficult to quit. This video offers important reasons to stop smoking and a framework of change to help you achieve your goal.

  • Smoking Cessation, Relapse Prevention

    A relapse happens when you return to smoking after a period of quitting—usually after the first three months. Most people experience several relapses before quitting for good. This video discusses situations that can trigger a relapse and offers a range of coping skills and behavior changes to get you back on track.

  • Influenza Vaccination

    Each winter, millions of people suffer from influenza—the flu. The flu virus infects the nose, throat, and lungs, and spreads from person to person through coughs and sneezes. The video explains why a flu shot is important to help prevent this illness, which can be life-threatening in older adults.

  • Depression Screening

    Everyone feels sad or "down" at one time or another, but this mood passes within a few days. If you have clinical depression, those feelings linger, interfering with daily life. This video discusses how a doctor or mental health professional screens patients for depression.

  • Colonoscopy

    Colonoscopy is a procedure that lets your doctor see directly inside your entire colon using a flexible tube. It can detect intestinal problems such as bleeding or early signs of colorectal cancer. In this video, you'll learn what you might experience during a colonoscopy and what to expect given your particular results.

  • Pneumococcal Vaccination

    Pneumococcal disease is a serious infection that affects the lungs, as well as other parts of the body. You can protect yourself against this illness by getting a vaccination. This video talks about who should get this shot and why this illness can be life-threatening.

  • Metered-Dose Inhaler

    An MDI is the most commonly used inhaler in treating lung diseases such as asthma and COPD. Unfortunately, many people who need an inhaler do not use it correctly, so they don't receive the full benefit of the medication. Watch this video to learn the best way to use your inhaler.

  • Peak Flow Meter

    A peak flow meter for asthma is like a thermometer for a fever - it helps you monitor what's going on inside your lungs by measuring airflow out of the lungs. The meter can tell you if your airways are narrowing well before asthma symptoms begin. Learn how to use a peak flow meter, how to find your "personal best," and how to set your peak flow zones.

  • Flexible Sigmoidoscopy

    Sigmoidoscopy allows a doctor to examine the lower portion of your colon using a thin tube. It may be used to help diagnose certain intestinal problems that can cause symptoms such as constipation or diarrhea, and abdominal pain. Abnormal growths may also be detected. This video describes a sigmoidoscopy and how it may inform you about your colorectal health.

  • ERCP

    ERCP stands for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, a diagnostic procedure used to evaluate problems of the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, and pancreas. The procedure combines the use of X-rays and an endoscope. This video explains how this procedure works and when it is warranted.

  • EGD: Upper Endoscopy

    An upper endoscopy (EGD) allows a doctor to visualize your esophagus, stomach, and duodenum, or the upper part of your small intestine. EGD uses a special tube to help diagnose illnesses such as acid reflux or peptic ulcer disease. In this video, you'll learn what you might experience during the actual procedure, as well as its benefits, and any potential risks.

  • Amblyopia

    Amblyopia or "lazy eye" is a childhood condition in which one eye's vision is reduced because the connection between that eye and the brain isn't working properly. This video examines how the condition develops and what can be done to correct it.

  • Am I a Candidate for LASIK?

    LASIK is a type of refractive eye surgery that can reduce or eliminate the need for eyeglasses or contact lenses. Although the procedure is popular, it is not for everyone. This video explores what criteria are important for this surgery.

  • Dry Eye Syndrome

    The cornea is a moist tissue that must remain constantly covered by a thin layer of tears in order to stay healthy. A person with dry eye syndrome doesn't produce enough tears, which causes corneal irritation. The video provides additional information on dry eyes and how the syndrome is treated.

  • Types of Eye Care Professionals

    Eye care professionals have similar sounding titles but have specific, separate roles. Ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians work together cooperatively to provide you with complete vision care. This video explains the differences in the three professionals.

  • Computer Vision Syndrome

    If you have pain around the eyes, headaches, and blurred vision after using a computer for several hours, you may have computer vision syndrome. You can ease symptoms with special computer glasses. Watch this video for additional details about this condition and tips on computer use.

  • Child's Vision Performance

    A child needs three important vision skills for the classroom: visual tracking, the ability to move the eye across the page; focus, the ability to move the attention from far to near or near to far; and fusion, the ability of the eyes to determine depth perception. This video discusses symptoms to watch for and vision training that can correct the problem.

  • Child's First Eye Exam

    It's important that your child have an eye exam as preparation for entering school. Up to 75 percent of the classroom day is spent with near-work or near-to-far focus, so your eye care professional should assess these skills in the exam. This video outlines the components of a child's eye exam.

  • Breast Biopsy

    If you have a lump in your breast or a suspicious area on your mammogram or ultrasound, your health care provider may recommend a breast biopsy. Having a biopsy doesn't necessarily mean you have cancer. View this video to learn about the types of biopsies available and what to expect during the procedure.

  • Breast Cancer Screening

    The goal of breast cancer screening is to detect cancer at the earliest possible stage, when it is most treatable. This video takes a look at the three components of breast screening—a breast self-exam, a clinical exam by your doctor, and a mammogram.

  • Folic Acid and Birth Defects

    Women of childbearing age should make sure that they get enough folic acid every day. Folic acid, one of the B vitamins, helps prevent neural tube birth defects. Watch this video to learn more about this important vitamin and its role in health.

  • Mammogram

    A mammogram is an X-ray of the breasts used either to screen for or diagnose breast cancer. A screening mammogram is done for women who have no symptoms but are at risk for breast cancer. This video tells you what to expect when you have a mammogram.

  • Menopause

    Menopause marks the end of a woman's menstrual periods. Menopause officially begins one year after your periods have stopped completely. This video explains what occurs in the time leading up to menopause and what can be done to relieve symptoms such as hot flashes.

  • Depression

    We all feel sad or "down" at different times of life, but for most of us, this mood eases within a few days. If you have clinical depression, the sad feelings linger, interfering with daily life. This video takes a closer look at this mental health disorder and what treatments are available.

  • Bipolar Disorder

    Bipolar disorder is similar to depression but is marked by mood swings that can cycle from mania to depression. This video discusses who's at risk for this disorder, the difficulty of making a diagnosis, and how it is treated.

  • Social Anxiety

    Social anxiety ranges from minor discomfort at making "small talk" at a party to severe social phobia that prevents a person from leaving the house. In this video, you'll learn more about anxiety disorders and what treatments are available.

  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    A person with obsessive-compulsive disorder has obsessions—thoughts or impulses that occur on their own, often over and over again, and compulsions—rituals the person performs to try to make the obsessions go away. This video explores the range of this disorder and how it is treated.

  • Panic Attacks

    Panic attacks are sudden attacks of intense anxiety that set your heart pounding, make you short of breath, and trigger thoughts like “I’m having a heart attack.” This video looks at what can trigger panic attacks and what you can do to prevent them or ease their impact.

  • Diabetes in Pregnancy

    Two types of diabetes can occur during pregnancy—pre-existing diabetes, which will continue after pregnancy, and gestational diabetes, which will go away after the baby is born. Diabetes is a condition in which your body doesn’t make enough insulin or you can’t use it correctly. This video offers details on how these two types diabetes can affect a pregnancy.

  • Exercise During Pregnancy

    There are benefits to getting regular exercise during pregnancy for most women. Work with your health care provider to develop a safe exercise program you can do throughout your pregnancy. This video discusses the benefits of exercise, as well as recommendations on how to exercise.

  • High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

    Even though most women with hypertension have healthy babies, they do have a higher risk of developing certain problems during pregnancy. Hypertension can damage the mother’s heart, kidneys and other organs. It can cause low-birth weight and early delivery of the baby. Early diagnosis and special monitoring of you and your baby by your healthcare provider are important.

  • Pregnancy After 35

    Thanks to medical advances, it is now safer and easier for women in their late 30s and 40s to have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. Still, there are factors that older moms-to-be should keep in mind. This video offers details on possible risks of pregnancy at this age and how you can minimize them.

  • Chronic Hypertension During Pregnancy

    Normal blood pressure is essential for a healthy pregnancy. If you have high blood pressure before you become pregnant, you are at higher risk for developing certain problems during pregnancy. This video explains how chronic high blood pressure can affect you and your growing baby and why special monitoring is important.

  • Gestational Diabetes in Pregnancy

    Diabetes is a common problem that can occur during pregnancy. This form of diabetes usually develops after the 28th week and goes away after your baby is born. This video discusses how gestational diabetes can affect you and your baby and how you can manage the condition.

  • Pre-Existing Diabetes in Pregnancy

    Diabetes occurs when your body doesn’t make enough insulin or you can’t use it correctly. When managed well, diabetes shouldn't keep you from having a healthy baby. This video describes how diabetes can affect a pregnancy.

  • Pregnancy Induced Hypertension

    Normal blood pressure is important to good health. Some women develop high blood pressure during their pregnancy. Why this occurs isn't known, but certain factors put you at higher risk. This video explains the risk factors and symptoms, and how this condition is managed.

  • Common Changes During Pregnancy

    Certain changes and discomforts occur during pregnancy - and are perfectly normal. Some of these changes include backache, frequent urination, and constipation. This video describes typical changes, how to safely relieve your discomfort, and what circumstances require a visit to your doctor.

  • Drugs, Alcohol and Smoking During Pregnancy

    During your pregnancy, everything you eat, drink, and smoke can affect you and your baby. These substances—whether healthy or harmful—reach your baby by crossing your placenta. In this video, you'll learn how harmful substances can affect the health of your developing child and why it's important to avoid them.

  • Infections During Pregnancy

    If you have an infection while pregnant, you can pass it on to your baby. Critical times are in the early part of pregnancy, when your baby’s organs are developing; during labor and delivery, and after childbirth. This video describes the steps you can take to prevent, find, and treat most infections.

  • Labor and Delivery

    Labor differs from woman to woman and from pregnancy to pregnancy, but common signs and symptoms can let you know when it is starting. Contractions that increase in strength and frequency are a sure sign you are in true labor. This video discusses the three stages of labor and delivery, as well as types of delivery.

  • Prenatal Testing

    Pre-pregnancy counseling and a physical exam will help to identify any tests you should have done before you get pregnant. Once pregnant, you should have certain routine tests, as well as other tests that reflect your specific needs. This video offers details on the range of prenatal testing offered.

  • Diabetes Related Eye Disease

    People with diabetes may develop eye problems such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. In this video, you'll find out more about these problems and what you can do to prevent them. The best approach is good control of your blood sugar levels. You should also have a yearly eye exam.

  • Foot Care for People with Diabetes

    Maintaining normal blood sugar levels helps to prevent diabetic foot problems: nerve damage, poor circulation, and infection. This video demonstrates how to do daily foot care that can impact the development of these complications.

  • Hypoglycemia in Diabetes

    Hypoglycemia, also called “low blood sugar” or an “insulin reaction,” occurs when the amount of sugar in your blood drops. This can happen if you skip a meal or take too much insulin. This video explores other reasons for hypoglycemia and what you can do to prevent it.

  • Insulin and Diabetes

    Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas that, among other jobs, lets you turn the food you eat into energy. Diabetes occurs when your pancreas either doesn't make enough insulin (type 1 diabetes) or your body can't use the insulin correctly (type 2 diabetes). This video offers additional information on the role of insulin in the body.

  • Kidney Care for People with Diabetes

    The delicate filtering network in your kidneys can be damaged over time by uncontrolled blood sugar, making it more difficult for your body to remove waste materials. This video explains why it's important to have your urine tested for protein if you have diabetes. It also offers other recommendations to help prevent kidney damage.

  • Meal Planning for People with Diabetes

    What should you eat if you have diabetes? The same healthy foods that people without diabetes should eat. The secret to a healthy diet is eating a wide variety of foods, especially fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. This video offers advice on what foods to choose.

  • Pre-Diabetes

    Pre-diabetes means your blood sugar level is above normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. Pre-diabetes increases the risk for developing diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. The good news is, with healthy lifestyle changes, you can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. Take action; watch this video to find out more about what you can do.

  • Blood Sugar Testing

    Monitoring your blood sugar level can help you control your diabetes and your risk for developing complications such as eye or kidney disease. View this video, and learn how and why checking your blood sugar regularly plays an important role in diabetes management.

  • Pressure Relieving Cushions

    Wheelchair cushions are designed to prevent pressure sores, as well as to maintain pelvic and spinal alignment, and a stable posture. These cushions redistribute the pressure away from at-risk areas. This video explains how to choose a cushion that meets your specific needs.

  • Pressure Sores Associated with Seating

    If you use a wheelchair, it's important to take steps to prevent pressure sores. When you sit, blood flow is restricted because skin tissue is pressed between bone and a firm surface, and a pressure sore may develop. This video discusses preventive measures and symptoms to watch for.

  • Hysterectomy Options: LSH

    Hysterectomy is a major surgical procedure in which the uterus and possibly the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and cervix are removed. The surgery can be done in several ways, one of which is LSH, or laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy. This video takes a closer look at the types of hysterectomies and recovery times for each.

  • Hysterectomy

    Hysterectomy is a major surgical procedure in which the uterus and possibly the cervix, ovaries, and fallopian tubes are removed. Fibroids in the uterus are a common reason for a hysterectomy. In this video, you'll find out other medical conditions that may require a hysterectomy and what to expect if you need this procedure.

  • Spinal Tap Procedure

    A spinal tap, also called lumbar puncture, is used to take a sample of the fluid from the spinal column to look for infection or bleeding. The most common reasons people need this procedure include severe headache, fever with a stiff neck or vomiting, or confusion. Watch this video to learn what happens during this procedure.

  • Fever in Children Older Than 3 Months

    A fever is only a symptom, not an illness. Many minor illnesses in children such as ear infections, colds, the flu, and urinary infections may cause fever. This video offers information on how to take a child's temperature and when a fever is a cause for concern.

  • Crutch Training

    If you have an injury or temporary disability that requires crutches, it's important to have them fitted by a health care professional. You will also need training and practice in using the crutches before going home. In this video, you'll learn about using crutches.

  • Lacerations and Wound Care

    Cuts in the skin are called “lacerations.” Treatment for your laceration depends upon where it is, how big it is, and how it happened. This video explains how cuts are treated and what you should do for follow-up care.

  • Bone Fractures and Sprains

    Broken or cracked bones are called “fractures.” Sprains are tears or stretching injuries to ligaments, the fibrous bands that hold your bones together. Both types of injuries can be painful and are often treated in the same way. This video offers detailed information on these injuries.

  • Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)

    Obstructive sleep apnea and snoring occur when tissues of the upper airway, tongue, and throat relax during sleep. This relaxation can obstruct and vibrate the airway, making breathing difficult. This video discusses an effective treatment for sleep apnea, a device that provides continuous positive airway pressure.

  • Narcolepsy

    Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder in which a person typically becomes sleepy or falls asleep, often at inappropriate times. This disorder may run in families and may begin at any age. In this video, you'll find out how narcolepsy develops, symptoms to watch for, and available treatments.

  • Parasomnias

    Parasomnias are disorders that disrupt sleep. If you walk or talk in your sleep or toss while dreaming, you probably have a parasomnia. These behaviors can wake you up partially or fully or disturb the sleep-stage transition. This video explains the different types of parasomnias and what to do if you have one.

  • Primary Insomnia

    Insomnia is defined as a difficulty falling asleep and/or maintaining sleep. It is a symptom, not a disorder. This video explores medical conditions and experiences that can cause insomnia and what your doctor may recommend for a good night's sleep.

  • Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is an unpleasant sensation that occurs while sitting or lying still, especially before or at bedtime. People with RLS describe a tingling, creepy-crawly, burning, or restless feeling in their legs. This video discusses possible causes of RLS and what you can do to minimize symptoms.

  • Sleep Hygiene

    Sleep hygiene refers to lifestyle habits that encourage a good night's sleep. These include sticking to a regular sleep schedule and setting up a relaxing environment before bedtime. This video explains why sleep hygiene is important and offers suggestions on how to improve yours.

  • Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome

    Delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) refers to someone who is an extreme “night owl.” A person with this syndrome feels most alert at the end of the day, when most other people are ready to turn in. In this video, you'll learn about your internal body clock and its effect on the sleep-wake cycle.

  • Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA)

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common problem that affects more people than diabetes or asthma. Untreated, OSA can lead to serious health problems, including high blood pressure and heart failure. This video gives an overview of OSA and how it is treated.

  • Periodic Limb Movements of Sleep

    Periodic limb movements of sleep (PLMS) is a sleep disorder characterized by uncontrolled, repeated movements in the lower limbs during sleep. A person with this disorder may not be aware of it and simply feel tired the next day. This video explores the possible causes and typical symptoms of PLMS.

  • Relaxation Exercises

    Stress is a part of life, but chronic stress can lead to health problems. Relaxation exercise can help you counteract the negative effects of stress. This video discusses the importance of learning to relax and different relaxation techniques you can try.

  • Sleep Apnea in Children

    A child with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has a partial or complete blockage of the airways during sleep, which causes pauses in breathing. This video explains who is at risk for OSA—it's most common between ages 2 and 7—and what you can do as a parent.

  • Sleep Studies (Your Night in the Sleep Lab)

    A sleep study, also called a polysomnogram, is an overnight study of your sleep. This study takes place in a specialized lab and is designed to detect problems with your sleep. In this video, you'll find out what to expect during your night in the sleep lab.

  • Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency that can lead to coma and even death if untreated. It is more common in people with type 1 diabetes. This video explains how this condition develops and why it can be life-threatening.

  • Asthma

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory condition that causes inflammation of the airways. This inflammation, which can be triggered by a variety of substances, makes the airways much narrower and interferes with breathing. This video discusses who is at risk for this condition and how it can be managed.

  • Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Treatment

    Because rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can damage the joints and cause chronic pain and loss of function, it is important to detect and treat this disease as early as possible. Effective treatment and self-care can control symptoms and limit joint damage. This video takes a look at the variety of therapies available.

  • Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Disease

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a disease of the joints, most often affecting the hand, wrist, foot, and knee. The joints become inflamed; over time, this inflammation can lead to joint damage, chronic pain, and loss of function. This video offers a detailed look at RA and how it develops.

  • Ovarian Cysts

    An ovarian cyst is a fluid-filled sac that forms on or in the ovary. Most cysts are harmless and don't cause any symptoms. In this video, you'll learn about different types of ovarian cysts and what treatment may be recommended if you have one.

  • How Your Heart Works - Animation

    Your heart is a pump that is responsible for delivering blood to all parts of your body. Arteries carry oxygen-rich blood from the lungs to nourish the cells, and veins transport oxygen-poor blood on its way back to the heart and lungs. This animation shows how the heart and circulatory system work.

  • Coronary Artery Disease: Risk Factors and Prevention

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease in the United States. CAD develops when the arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle harden and narrow with a buildup of plaque. This video discusses who's at risk for CAD and what you can do to help prevent it.

  • Coronary Artery Disease: Treatment

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) develops when the arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle harden and narrow with a buildup of plaque. Treatment is primarily through lifestyle changes and medication. This video examines the goals of treatment.

  • Cardiac Stress Tests

    A cardiac stress test may be ordered if you have or are suspected of having coronary artery disease. This test evaluates your heart’s response to stress or exercise. Watch this video and learn what to expect before, during, and after this procedure. Other types of stress tests will also be presented.

  • Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    This procedure, a common type of open heart surgery, is one way to treat blockages in the arteries of the heart. Watch the video and learn about the surgery and what you can expect during recovery and rehabilitation.

  • Cardiac Catheterization

    Cardiac catheterization procedure can diagnose a variety of heart conditions and determine the health of your coronary arteries, heart valves, and heart muscle. View this video to learn what happens during this procedure and various treatment options.

  • Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Physical activity is healthy for your heart—even after you've had a heart attack or bypass surgery. It's important to start out slowly, under the supervision of cardiac rehab specialists. In this video, you'll learn what's involved in cardiac rehab and how it can benefit your health in the long term.

  • Heart Failure

    Heart failure is a condition in which your heart cannot pump enough oxygenated blood to meet your body’s needs. This video explains the different types of heart failure, and the treatments that can help you manage your condition and live a healthy life.

  • Heart Murmurs

    Blood flowing through the heart is usually silent. A heart murmur is blood flow that makes a noise. Turbulent blood flow in or near the heart creates extra heart sounds, which can be heard with a stethoscope. This video explains how a heart murmur occurs and when it is a cause for concern.

  • Cardiac Arrhythmias

    The beating of your heart is very organized, taking its cue from a built-in electrical system. A normal heart rate is regular, at 60 to 100 beats per minute. An arrhythmia is any kind of abnormal heartbeat—too fast, too slow, or irregular. This video explains different arrhythmias and what you should do if you have one.

  • Pacemakers

    You may need a pacemaker if you have an abnormal heartbeat. To understand how a pacemaker works, watch this video. It will also help you learn how to care for and live with your pacemaker.

  • ICDs: Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators

    People who have serious arrhythmias or who have experienced sudden cardiac death may benefit with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). The device can deliver a shock when it senses that an abnormal rhythm is present. This video offers detailed information about these implantable devices.

  • Mitral Valve Prolapse

    The mitral valve has two flaps between the upper left atrium and lower left ventricle of the heart. When your heart beats, this valve opens and closes in a rhythmic pattern. Mitral valve prolapse occurs when the valve doesn't close properly. Watch this video to learn more about MVP and how it can affect your health.

  • Heart Attacks

    Millions of Americans suffer heart attacks every year. Half of these are fatal, and some of the rest cause severe damage to heart's function. This video explains what happens during a heart attack and what can be done to minimize the damage.

  • Atherosclerosis

    Atherosclerosis refers to the hardening and narrowing of arteries caused by a slow buildup of plaque on the artery walls. Narrowed arteries restrict blood flow, and small clots can form and partially or completely block an artery. In this video, you'll find out how atherosclerosis develops and what you can do to prevent it.

  • Hypertension

    Hypertension is the medical term for high blood pressure. Blood pressure is the force at which blood flows through the large blood vessels from the heart. When blood pressure is high over a period of time, it can lead to health problems, including stroke. This video offers details about blood pressure, its importance to health, and what you can do to keep yours normal.

  • Stroke

    A stroke occurs when either too much blood or too little blood disrupts blood flow to part of the brain. This deprives brain tissue of necessary oxygen and nutrients. Within minutes brain cells begin to die and the result is a loss of brain function.

  • Tubal Ligation

    Tubal ligation, which is sometimes known as having your tubes tied, is a surgical procedure that closes your fallopian tubes so that your eggs cannot be fertilized.