Celebrating the Best in Healthcare

The five campuses of Baptist Medical Center are proud to be named in the Best Regional Hospitals by U.S. News & World Report for 2020-2021. The five Baptist hospitals in San Antonio (Baptist Medical Center, Mission Trail, Northeast Baptist, St. Luke’s Baptist, and North Central Baptist) are recognized as high performing in five types of care: Congestive Heart Failure, Colon Cancer Surgery, COPD, Hip Replacement and Knee Replacement. Thank you to our dedicated physicians, nurses and staff who truly make us A Community Built on Care.

Talk to an ER Provider from Home

In remaining consistent with Baptist Health System COVID SAFE standards, we are offering the San Antonio community a safe alternative to seek emergency care with one of our experienced emergency room providers via a secure virtual Tele-ER platform.



Book a Tele-ER visit in minutes. All you need is a smartphone, tablet or computer. Call (210) 297-5033 for your Tele-ER visit.

About Baptist Health

Baptist Health System has more than 115 years’ history of caring for our community and making a positive difference. From welcoming your babies to restoring health or treating you in an emergency, we know that care is more than medicine. It’s compassion. It’s attentiveness. And a healthy dose of kindness. Our system of care includes six full-service hospitals, a specialized children’s hospital with a dedicated pediatric emergency unit, a comprehensive cancer care network, fitness and rehabilitation centers, urgent care clinics, a physician network, imaging centers, ambulatory services and the Baptist School of Health Professions. Wherever you go in the Baptist Health System, you’ll find that we have the same goal – to help people achieve health for life through compassionate service inspired by faith.

Caring, nurturing and helping heal friends, loved ones and neighbors is our passion. We are honored to have the opportunity to serve you.

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News & Announcements

Experts urge ‘don’t delay screening for colon cancer’ as life-saving prevention

Apr 18, 2021

U.S. health agencies announce screenings for colon cancer should begin at age 45

Colon-Cancer-400-x-300Colon cancer is a silent and often deadly disease, killing more than 50,000 each year in the United States. It is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in both men and women. Yet, it is largely preventable with screenings and curable if detected early.  According to the American Cancer Society, the incidence of colon cancer has been increasing in younger people. From 2012 through 2016, colon cancer increased every year by 2 percent in people younger than 50 and 1 percent in people ages 50 to 64.

The American Cancer Society and the U.S Preventive Task Force recently announced new recommendations that screenings for colon cancer should now begin at age 45, which is five years earlier than previously thought. As the one-year anniversary of the COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S. coincides with Colon Cancer Awareness Month, physicians are urging people not to delay their screenings. Nearly 1 in 3 individuals are not up to date with their colon cancer screenings and that number could be higher since the pandemic began.

James Prieto, M.D., a colorectal surgeon with the Baptist Physicians Network, emphasizes that holding off on seeing a doctor, getting screened or going to the ER when needed can result in a greater risk of complications, disability and lengthier recovery times if conditions are left undiagnosed or untreated.

“The best way to prevent colorectal cancer is to be screened regularly beginning at age 45,” Dr. Prieto said. Our clinics and hospitals follow COVID safety procedures so it’s safe for anyone to be seen. A phone call to connect with a doctor and a screening could save your life,” Dr. Prieto said.

Some individuals are at higher risk for colon cancer if they have a family history of colon cancer or polyps, a personal history of Crohn’s Disease or Ulcerative Colitis that cause chronic inflammation of the small intestine or colon. Other risk factors for colon cancer include: obesity, lack of physical activity, smoking cigarettes and excessive consumption of alcohol.

Colon-Cancer-Couple--400-x-300Colon cancer also disproportionately affects the Black community, where the rates are the highest of any racial/ethnic group in the U.S. African Americans are about 20 percent more likely to get colorectal cancer and about 40 percent more likely to die from it than most other groups. The reasons for the differences are complex, but they largely reflect differences in risk factors and in health care access.

John Winston, M.D., an African American colorectal surgeon who practices with the Baptist Health System, emphasizes that holding off on seeing a doctor, getting screened or going to the ER when needed can result in a greater risk of complications, disability and lengthier recovery times if conditions are left undiagnosed or untreated.

“The best way to prevent colorectal cancer is to be screened regularly starting at age 45,” Dr. Winston said. “We want to encourage the community to connect with a healthcare provider who can evaluate them carefully,” he said.

Early detection and treatment results in a 90 percent survival rate and that 60 percent of colorectal cancer-related deaths could have been prevented with a screening.

Sources: American Cancer Society and Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy